Understanding Sikhism, The Research Journal, is no longeravailable in paper (printed) form. You may contact Prof. Devinder SinghChahal by emailing at sikhism@iuscanada.com.Articles and Table of Contents for the pastissues are available in electronic form.

 

2015

Table of Contents and Abstracts
January - December 2015, Vol. 17, No. 1

EDITORIAL

In This Issue...
Prof Devinder Singh Chahal, PhD
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FEATURE ARTICLE

ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS PERSPECTIVES FROM NANAKIAN PHILOSOPHY
Prof Devinder Singh Chahal, PhD

ABSTRACT
The term ‘environmental ethics’ is a part of wider term, ‘environment philosophy’, which is a branch of philosophy that is concerned with the natural environment and humanity's place within it. Our Earth is the third planet from our Sun. Nevertheless, the Earth is the only planet in this Universe known to us which can sustain life although there is the possibility that there may be millions of such planets which can sustain life. Since the Earth provides everything to sustain life, therefore, Guru Nanak calls it “Mother Earth” ( ਧਰਤੀ ਮਾਤਾ – AGGS, p 1021). Guru Nanak in his first verse, Jap, has equated Air as the Guru, Water as the father and the Earth as mother during the early part of 16th century. Consequently, it necessitates that we formulate environmental ethics to keep Mother Earth and its environment safe for as long as possible. However, before formulating the environmental ethics one must be aware of the fact that the Earth has been constantly changing; it was never in the state which we observe today and will never be in the same state in the future in spite of all our efforts to save it. In this paper the formulation of environmental ethics are discussed according to Nanakian Philosophy.
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FEATURE ARTICLE

GURU NANAK’S TRAVEL AN APPRAISAL OF BAKU VISIT
Gurvinder Singh Chohan, B.Eng, MBA

ABSTRACT
Taking reference of many research papers and books written by eminent scholars and historians have always intrigued me to find out some facts about the travels by Guru Nanak. This article examines the various sites cited in research papers and books where Guru Nanak claimed to have visited and examine it in light of empirical evidence culled from early contemporary sources as well as from current understanding of existing monuments. By questioning various arguments and proofs regarding the paucity of general historical information about Guru Nanak’s travel, the author argues that the Guru Nanak indeed visited these sites. In series of the articles, starting with Baku (Azerbaijan), I will try to put forth some arguments for each site Guru Nanak visited. Next Article would be focused on Istanbul, Turkey.
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FEATURE ARTICLE

SIKH IDENTITY Sikhs are Passing Through
Baldev Singh Sandha

ABSTRACT
A Sikh is a learner. For a Sikh, God - a unique transcendent invisible entity present in all existence - is a part and parcel of life that originates from a clean source and, as such, a search for spiritual ideals is free from the bondage of personal possessions and wealth. The ‘worship’ of Aad Guru Granth Sahib by a Sikh implies action as per the ‘philosophy, ethics, culture and way of life’ as prescribed in the teachings treasured in Aad Guru Granth Sahib and communicated to the learner through the Sabds (hymns) - the pivotal force of Sikhism. No wonder, Guru Arjan refers Aad Guru Granth Sahib “The Holy Book as the home of the Transcendent God.” And, Guru Gobind Singh declared it to be eternal Guru of Sikhs.

A glance through Aad Granth yields the seven inter-twined layers that lay bare the necessary condition of the value-cum-belief system of the identity of a Sikh. The three sufficiency condition related elements of the identity of a Sikh, namely the dress code, the nomenclature, and the formal initiation procedure to Sikh Brotherhood, bear the signature stamp of Guru Gobind Singh. Consequently, there exists a landscape of people who profess Sikhism faith in the Census statistics, namely Amrit-dhari, Keshdhari and clean-shaved Sikhs, the numbers that are boasted by the faith as well as political leadership of Sikhs.

The rising preponderance of clean-shaved Sikhs, particularly amongst the Sikh youth, in rural Punjab, more so, among the members of Sikh diaspora, is, indeed, a sign of worry. As a response, a number of research issues are listed for diagnostic analysis in the context of Indian Punjab and diaspora. These research issues call for empirical investigation to objectively delineate the causes and only, thereafter, changes required in the present pattern of institutional leadership of Sikh faith can be deciphered and deliberated upon.
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Editorial Board

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