Understanding Sikhism, The Research Journal, is no longeravailable in paper (printed) form. You may contact Prof. Devinder SinghChahal by emailing at sikhism@iuscanada.com.Articles and Table of Contents for the pastissues are available in electronic form.

 

2016

Table of Contents and Abstracts
January - December 2016, Vol. 18, No. 1

EDITORIAL

Emerging Religious Issues and Punjabi Language
Prof Devinder Singh Chahal, PhD
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FEATURE ARTICLES

RELIGION - EMERGING ISSUE AND CONCERNS
Prof Devinder Singh Chahal, PhD

ABSTRACT
The world is passing through unrest. Terrorist attacks on small or large scale on innocent people are on the increase throughout the world since the terrorists’ attack on the twin towers of World Trade Center in New York during September 11, 2001 where many innocent people of various religions were killed. The emerging issues and concerns of every religion are different from that of others. In most of the cases minority religions suffer the most in every country. However, it is not realized that a majority religion in certain countries is a minority religion in others. Sikhism is in a special category since it is a minority religion in all the countries including India. Therefore, they have their own special issues and concerns. This paper discusses emerging issues and concerns about religions with special reference to Sikhism and also solution to work for peace in the world through scientific and logical approach as well as through the application of basic principles of Nanakian Philosophy.
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THE ORIGIN OF THE PUNJABI LANGUAGE: ITS PROGRESS AND EXPANSION
Prof Devinder Singh Chahal, PhD

ABSTRACT
The theory that the Punjabi language is one of the branches of ‘Apabrahmsa’ (vernacular language) being derived from the so-called ‘Prakrit’, which was derived from ‘Sanskrit’, has been widely accepted by Sikh theologians, linguists and historians. This status of the Punjabi language as Apabrahmsa, makes the Sikhs and others to avoid writing and speaking in Punjabi. This paper will disprove the above theory by discussing the historical background of the development of the ‘Indo-European Languages’, especially in the area currently called the Punjab. The language which developed in the Punjab after the arrival of the Aryans from 4,000 to 1,000 BCE is called ‘Proto-Indo-Aryan language’. In this paper, Proto-Indo-Aryan language is called ‘Proto-Punjabi’ since it developed in the Punjab. When Proto-Indo-Aryan or just Proto-Punjabi was used to write the sacred granths of Jainism and Buddhism it was called ‘Pali’ by the Buddhists. However, the same ‘Proto-Punjabi’ was named ‘Punjabi’ around 500 CE by the Persians and was used by the Sufi Sheikh Farid to disseminate his message to the people of Punjab - the land of five rivers, during the 12th century CE. Subsequently, almost all Bhagats of India, Guru Nanak and Sikh Gurus, who succeeded to the ‘House of Nanak’, used that ‘Punjabi language’ to write their verses (bani).
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WHAT IS THE LANGUAGE OF THE HOLY SCRIPTURE Of SIKHISM?
Prof Devinder Singh Chahal, PhD

ABSTRACT
Sikh theologians, linguists, researchers and writers accept that the verses (bani) found in the holy scripture of Sikhism contain many languages: Sanskrit, Sehskrit, Prakrit, Persian, and Apabrahmsa, which includes Sant Bhasha, Braj, Punjabi, Hindi, Gujrati, Bengali, Bihari, etc. This paper will discover the accurate name of the language used by Sufis, Bhagats, Guru Nanak and Sikh Gurus, whose bani were included in the holy scripture now called “Aad Guru Granth Sahib”
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